Some writing doesn’t brush up against sentimentality as often as other writing. But whatever ‘bad’ edge your writing brushes up against, I think it’s important to touch it. You can always pull back from it, but at least you know where it is. It’s like when I was a dancer, we were always encouraged to fall in rehearsal, so that you could know what the tipping point of any given movement was. That way, when you did it on the stage, you could be sure you were taking it to the edge without falling on your face. It sounds like a cliché, but really it’s just physics — if you don’t touch the fulcrum, you’ll never gain a felt sense of it, and your movement will be impoverished for it.
— Maggie Nelson, in response to ‘Is it important to risk sentimentality?’ in an interview with Genevieve Hudson for Bookslut (via arabellesicardi)

(Source: bostonpoetryslam, via gualyall)

jeou:

The same month when storyboards came about [for the movie], Miyazaki set off to the ancient forests of Yakushima, in Kyushu and the mountains of Shirakami-Sanchi in northern Honshu [of Japan].
It was just right, the ruins of this ancient forest reflects on us as humans. We need to learn to appreciate what we have left of the environment, and I wanted this as a theme for the animation.” -Miyazaki on his inspiration for Princess Mononoke

(via wibnutler)